Rejected PPI On Storecards? You May Be Able To Claim Again

Posted on February 3, 2017 by Canary Claims Rejected PPI On Storecards? You May Be Able To Claim Again

According to a study released in the media earlier this week, people who have had their ppi claim on storecards rejected by the banks may be able to successfully claim back compensation again thanks to a clever little trick.

Rejected PPI On Storecards? You May Be Able To Claim Again

Credit: birminghammail.co.uk

Individuals who signed up on credit card agreements with high-street stores such as Topshop and Debenhams, prior to 2002, were in the majority mis-sold payment protection insurance policies as well, with these agreements.

People who took out such agreements, usually are able to reclaim ppi compensation, but many people making a complaint have discovered that their ppi claims have been rejected.

If a person has had their ppi case rejected, they can directly apply for compensation with the underwriters. By using this technique, individuals can claim back compensation, even if their claim was previously rejected.

The Birmingham Mail website reported more on this story:

From the birminghammail.co.uk

Store cards used to be very lucrative for high street chains. They were sold as a line of credit for customers who couldn’t – or didn’t want to – pay in one go. Retailers made a profit on those who failed to pay off the card’s balance each month, as this resulted in an interest charge set between 18% and 30%.

Store cards are not as popular these days, partly because tough regulations were introduced in 2011 to prevent shoppers falling into debt. The Government banned commission and upfront discounts being attached to store cards, as well as allowing a seven day cooling off period after any store card sale.

But in the 1990s and early 2000s, store cards were routinely flogged at the till – and payment protection insurance was usually thrown into the bargain.

Was I mis-sold PPI on a store card?

Unless you have been living under a rock, you probably know that PPI was meant to cover payments on financial products like mortgages or credit cards should the user lose their income through illness or redundancy.

However, it was horrendously mis-sold and banks were forced by a High Court ruling in 2011 to offer compensation to all affected customers. Since then, about 13 million complaints have been made.

So if you were sold a store card many moons ago, a complaint about mis-sold PPI could well be justified – if it hasn’t been brought already.